About Bsee / Tribal Engagement & Consultation

Tribal Engagement & Consultation

Tribal Engagement & Consultation

Federally recognized tribes are sovereign nations exercising government-to-government relations with the United States. These relations usually take the form of legally required consultation, and in most day-to-day consultations with tribes and Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act Corporations (ANCSA), the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) Tribal and Community Liaison serves as the official bureau representative.

The essential reason for Native American consultation is to identify the cultural values, the religious beliefs, the traditional practices, and the legal rights of Native American people, which could be affected by BSEE actions on the Outer Continental Shelf. BSEE implements consultation policies through formal government-to-government consultation and informal dialogue, collaboration, and engagement. BSEE is committed to maintaining open and transparent communications with Tribal governments, ANCSA corporations, Alaska Native Organizations, Native Hawaiian Organizations and other indigenous communities. BSEE’s emphasizes trust, respect, and shared responsibility as part of a deliberative process to promote effective collaboration and informed decision-making.

Many Native Americans live near and use areas where BSEE activities are proposed and conducted. The ancestors of today’s tribes occupied vast areas of land and depended on nearby ocean resources, even prior to both sea level rise at the end of the last ice age and interaction with the U.S. government. Furthermore, it is important to note the impact that the history of Federal law and policy has had on tribal access to ancestral lands. Policies such as the Indian Removal Act of 1830 resulted in mass removal of Native Americans from their lands. These types of actions continue to have long-lasting impacts on tribes and their relationship with the Federal government.

Tribal Consultation

Decommissioning of Oil and Gas Platforms in the Pacific Region
The purpose and need for this Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) is to support future Federal review of and action on decommissioning applications for platforms, pipelines, and other facilities offshore Southern California on the Pacific OCS. Currently, eight oil and gas platforms on the OCS offshore Southern California, near Point Conception and in the Santa Barbara Channel, no longer produce oil and gas and are located on terminated leases that no longer allow resumption of production. BSEE expects to receive decommissioning applications for these platforms and associated pipelines and other facilities in the near term. It is currently unknown when decommissioning may be initiated for the remaining 15 platforms, though by regulation an initial platform removal application must be submitted for Pacific OCS facilities at least two years before production is projected to cease.

Financial Assurance Rule
Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) included BSEE staff on the scheduling of a consultation with the Southern Ute Growth Fund regarding their interest in “Red Willow Offshore, LLC” and the potential impact of the Financial Assurance Rule. Those discussions were postponed until early 2021. Shortly thereafter, the Financial Assurance Rule was terminated.

Consultation Topic

Decommissioning of Oil and Gas Platforms in the Pacific Region
The purpose and need for this Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) is to support future Federal review of and action on decommissioning applications for platforms, pipelines, and other facilities offshore Southern California on the Pacific OCS. Currently, eight oil and gas platforms on the OCS offshore Southern California, near Point Conception and in the Santa Barbara Channel, no longer produce oil and gas and are located on terminated leases that no longer allow resumption of production. BSEE expects to receive decommissioning applications for these platforms and associated pipelines and other facilities in the near term. It is currently unknown when decommissioning may be initiated for the remaining 15 platforms, though by regulation an initial platform removal application must be submitted for Pacific OCS facilities at least two years before production is projected to cease.

General information on BOEM/BSEE Decommissioning in Pacific
Pacific Oil and Gas Decommissioning Activities | Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (boem.gov)

Federal Register Notice can be found at https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2021/09/23/2021-20588/programmatic-environmental-impact-statement-for-oil-and-gas-decommissioning-activities-on-the

Financial Assurance Rule
The proposed rule hopes to clarify, streamline and provide greater transparency to financial assurance requirements (e.g., bonding) for the offshore oil and gas industry, while protecting American taxpayers against high-risk decommissioning liabilities. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) will analyze the comments and, as appropriate and addressed them in a final rule.

BOEM General Information on Proposed Financial Assurance Rule
https://www.boem.gov/proposed-financial-assurance-rule

Contacts

Tribal Consultation Policy

 

Jack Lorrigan
BSEE Tribal and Community Liaison Jack Lorrigan is originally from Sitka, Alaska, and is a Tribal citizen of the Sitka Tribe.

Contact
Jack Lorrigan
BSEE Tribal and Community Liaison
Phone: 907-334-5357
Email: jack.lorrigan@bsee.gov